Haleakala AE-25 - History

Haleakala AE-25 - History



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Haleakala

An extinct volcano located on the eastern end of the island of Maui, Hawaii, meaning House of the Sun.

(AE-25: dp. 8,300 It., 1. 512', b. 72'; dr. 29' s. 20 k.;
cpl. 331; a. 4 3"; cl Suribachi)

Haleakala (AE-25) was launched 17 February 1959 by Bethlehem-Sparrows Point Shipyard, Inc., Baltimore, Md., sponsored by Mrs. Maurice E. Curts, wife of Vice Admiral Curts, and commissioned 3 November 1959, Captain Miles P. Refo, III, in command.

After shakedown out of Guantanamo Bay Haleakala transited the Panama Canal and visited Chile and Costa Rica before arriving San Francisco 17 March 196O. The fifth of a new class of ammunition ships designed from the hull up for carrying and transferring at sea the latest in munitions and guided missiles, Haleakala spent the first part of April with Vega conducting replenishment exercises to test new equipment.

Haleakala departed San Francisco 7 July 1960 on her first Western Pacific deployment. Visiting Pearl Harbor, Yokosuka, and Sasebo, she provided services to various units of the 7th Fleet before returning to Port Chicago, Calif., 19 December 1960.

Haleakala departed on her second deployment to the Western Pacific 18 April 1961 and again serviced units Of the 7th Fleet, returning to Port Chicago 8 September. In October, in company with Mount Ratmai, she steamed to Long Beach to participate in Exercise "Covered Wagon", an effort to test realistically a representative Attack Carrier Strike Force in all of its wartime tasks in the face of opposition similar to that which might be expected of a potential enemy.

Haleakala made two subsequent deployments to the Western Pacific between 29 May 1962 and February 1964. She arrived Todd Shipyard, Inc., Seattle, 28 February 1964 for overhaul and modernization to increase her efficiency and safety. With conversion completed by May 1965, through the fall of 1965 Haleakala participated in Operation "Baseline." On 20 November she sailed for Yankee Station via Pearl Harbor to support combat operations in Vietnam, returning to Subic Bay 31 December.

Most of 1966 was spent on another WestPac deployment. Haleakala departed Subic Bay 23 August for the West Coast, arriving San Francisco 12 September. After training exercises off Mare Island through December, Haleakala returned for further replenishment operations off Vietnam into 1967.


USS Haleakala AE-25 (1960-1993)

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A Brief History of Haleakala

According to legend, the demigod Maui set out to capture the sun and slow it down for his mother, Hina. She was a talented woman who created cloth out of pounded bark (Kapa), but lamented that the sun moved across the sky too quickly for her cloth to dry. So Maui headed to the peak of Mt. Haleakala, AKA “house of the sun.” Once at the top, Maui lassoed the sun in an effort to slow it down and lengthen the day..

Emerging from two large shield volcanoes, the West Maui Mountains first appeared approximately 1.3-2 million years ago with Haleakala following approximately 750, 000-1 million years ago. As lava flowed from the volcano, Haleakala continued growing over time. Today it stands 10,023 feet above ocean level. The crater is roughly seven miles across, two miles wide, and 3,000 ft. deep. Recent dating tests reveal that Haleakala most likely last erupted sometime in the 17th century. Once thought to be extinct, scientists now believe the volcano is actually just dormant and may erupt again in the next 500 years. Sensors have been installed on the mountain to monitor seismic activity.

Haleakala is at the heart of the Haleakala National Park, but there’s more to the park than just the volcano. Established in 1916, the national park covers more than 30,000 acres. It runs from the volcano’s rim all the way down to the Pacific Ocean shoreline.

The Haleakala National Park is home to more endangered species than any other U.S. National Park. The Hawaiian silversword is an endangered plant that cannot be found anywhere else in the world. The nene, a once nearly extinct Hawaiian goose, can also be spotted (and heard) in the park.

It has been argued how many climate zones there are in the world, some say 14, others say 20. What we do know, is that Haleakala National Park has a majority of them descending from desert to forest to coastal. When visiting Maui, most people don’t think to pack a heavy jacket, but a warm jacket is important if you are planning a trip up to the summit to watch the sunrise, because there are often freezing temperatures.

Over the years, crowds wanting to watch the sunrise at the summit have grown. Consequently, the National Parks Service have implemented a way to manage the crowds. In February, 2017, a reservation system was put into place. Reservations are now required to enter the Summit District between 3:00 A.M. and 7:00 A.M. For more information or to book your reservation, visit the National Parks Service website.

A majority of people, who enter the national park, are there for the sunrise. But, if you want to skip the heavy crowds (or forget to make reservations), we recommend visiting at sunset. Nearly as beautiful, it’s a far more relaxed atmosphere for viewing, and you don’t have to rush to be at the summit in the wee hours of the morning. Additionally, if you stay up there until it’s dark, you may be able to see the Milky Way. At the least, you’ll see planets, moons (Jupiter’s moons!) and millions of stars. It’s one of the best stargazing locations in the world. The visitor center has star maps, and you can rent binoculars from various dive shops or hotels.

Haleakala is one of Maui’s natural treasures. If you visit, take your time to enjoy it. There are things at Haleakala National Park you won’t see anywhere else in the world.

By the way, did you know that you can now save $10/person on our Maui Princess Dinner Cruise or a Snorkel Adventure to the island of Lanai? Well you can! Just use the promo code VIP20 after clicking on this link: Hawaii Ocean Project Adventures .

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USS Haleakala (AE-25)

USS Haleakala (AE-25) was a Nitro-class ammunition ship of the United States Navy in service from 1959 to 1993.

The USS Haleakala (AE-25) was launched on 17 February 1959 by Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation in Baltimore, Maryland and was sponsored by Mrs. Maurice E. Curts, wife of Vice Admiral Maurice Curts. Haleakala was commissioned 3 November 1959, with Captain Miles P. Refo, III in command.

After shakedown out of Guantanamo Bay Haleakala transited the Panama Canal and visited Chile and Costa Rica before arriving at San Francisco, 17 March 1960. The fifth of a new class of ammunition ships designed from the hull up for carrying and transferring at sea the latest in munitions and guided missiles, Haleakala spent the first part of April with Vega (AF-59) conducting replenishment exercises to test new equipment.

Haleakala departed San Francisco 7 July 1960 on her first Western Pacific deployment. Visiting Pearl Harbor, Yokosuka, and Sasebo, she provided services to various units of the 7th Fleet before returning to Port Chicago, California, 19 December 1960.

Haleakala departed on her second deployment to the Western Pacific 18 April 1961 and again serviced units of the 7th Fleet, returning to Port Chicago 8 September. In October, in company with Mount Katmai (AE-16), she steamed to Long Beach to participate in Exercise "Covered Wagon", an effort to test realistically a representative Attack Carrier Strike Force in all of its wartime tasks in the face of opposition similar to that which might be expected of a potential enemy.

Haleakala made two subsequent deployments to the Western Pacific between 29 May 1962 and February 1964. She arrived Todd Shipyards, Seattle, 25 February 1964 for overhaul and modernization to increase her efficiency and safety. With conversion completed by May 1965, through the fall of 1965 Haleakala participated in Operation Baseline. On 20 November she sailed for Yankee Station via Pearl Harbor to support combat operations in Vietnam, returning to Subic Bay 13 December.

Most of 1966 was spent on another Western Pacific deployment. Haleakala departed Subic Bay 23 August for the West Coast, arriving San Francisco 12 September. After training exercises off Mare Island through December, Haleakala returned for further replenishment operations off Vietnam into 1967.


Haleakalā’s cultural significance

Dubbed Alehe-la by ancient Hawaiians—a word that over time became the “Haleakalā” we presently know—the volcano may not have been permanently inhabited (most Polynesians who arrived around A.D. 400-800 settled along the island’s shores and in its more verdant regions), but evidence and oral retellings reinforce that it was an extraordinary place for a culture who, as Science puts it, “celebrates a profound spiritual celebration with the land,” with the greatest reverence reserved for high mountain peaks (which were and are considered wao akua, or “the realms of the gods”). Religious ceremonies were held on the rim of the summit and within the crater, while bird hunting was ubiquitous, in part to harvest feathers for ceremonial cloaks some of those rituals are still performed today.

“Hawaiians today use some of the sites in Haleakalā as their ancestors used for ceremonial purposes,” the park’s cultural resources manager Elizabeth Gordon says, while associate professor of Hawaiian studies at the University of Hawaii Maui college Kiope Raymond cites the worship of different deities, the solstice, and the burial of newborns’ umbilical cords, alongside the remains of their ancestors, as ongoing practices. “As with many Native American people, the bones of the dead are considered repositories of spiritual energy, or mana, and are revered by native Hawaiians.”

While many of the current practices are unseen to visitors—such as people driving to the volcano to seek spiritual guidance by visiting one of the two ahu, or stone altars, at the summit—artifacts of Haleakalā’s cultural significance, from heiau (temple) to pictographs and ancient platforms, remain.

“Haleakalā has always been that place I go to cleanse, to think, to give pule (prayer), to find answers,” Tiare Lawrence, a community organizer on Maui, says.

Given its history and the power it continues to emanate, a number of Hawaiians have expressed frustration “that their ancestral relationship to the land has been severed,” The Smithsonian reports, taking into account that the Hawaiian Renaissance of the 1970s spurred interest in reclaiming what’s vanished. The park’s superintendent Sarah Creachbaum agrees and says her staff is “working very hard to break down barriers. We’re trying to incorporate traditional knowledge into management practices.” Native Hawaiian rangers, consultations with Hawaiian elders (or kupuna), and the inclusion of oral histories in the park’s programs are just a few of the steps being taken to achieve this end.


An Ancient Quest

Imagine for a moment you’re a teenage boy living on the slopes of Haleakala in the mid 15th century.

Since you were a boy you had a fascination with canoes, the ancient Hawaiian version of a new car. You have lived in your parents kuahale (ancient house complex) with eight other people as a child. At around the age of 9 or 10 (it’s hard to know since Hawaiians didn’t count years of birth) your interest in canoes peaked, so you moved in to live with the canoe Kahuna (expert) where you learned the craft of building and maintaining canoes. Your brother had a similar experience in the forest. He loved being in the ancient forest of koa, ohia and sandalwood trees that towered over 100ft into the clouds along the slopes of Haleakala volcano. Your brothers skills became that of a birdcatcher – their feathers were used to adorn the clothing of the Ali’i (chiefs or ruling class) and this region was renowned throughout the Hawaiian islands for the vibrant colors of Haleakala’s forest birds.

The kahunas (called a Kalai Wa’a – canoe experts/teacher and a Kia Manu – bird catching expert) who trained you and your brother have determined, after consulting the stars, the weather, nature signs and time of year, have performed various ceremonies and sacrifices. They have determined that the gods approve and it is time for both you and your brother to venture into the forest to test your skills. You are instructed to consult your own dreams and decide when you are ready to leave on your quest. Soon all signs are in balance and the two of you depart. The drumming, singing and dancing of your village’s kuahale (house complexes) and ohana (family) accompany you as you hike up the slopes towards the towering forests above.


Haleakala Ranch History

The history of Haleakala Ranch and Maui have long been intertwined. Many of today’s upcountry Maui families are descendants of those who once worked for, or with, the Ranch.

On September 1, 1888, Haleakala Ranch was incorporated in the Kingdom of Hawaii during the reign of King David Kalakaua. Shortly following incorporation, Henry Perrine Baldwin, co-founder of Alexander & Baldwin, became a shareholder and invested substantially in the 33,817-acre Ranch, which included Haleakala Crater. H.P. was also elected as the Ranch’s president.

Shortly after, the Ranch hired its first manager, W.F. Pogue, who would be assisted by New Zealander Louis von Tempsky. Within a short time, von Tempsky assumed the management role and the Ranch opened the island’s first dairy, planted 10,000 trees, voluntarily fenced 7,000 acres as forest reserve to protect watersheds, and introduced polo to the Maui community.

As the Ranch moved into the 20th century, Harry Baldwin became the Ranch’s president and his brother Sam succeeded von Tempsky as manager. In 1925 the two consolidated ranch ownership and built it into the enduring community institution it is today.

In 1927 the Baldwin brothers agreed to a land exchange that would allow the Territory of Hawaii to acquire Haleakala Crater from the Ranch to create Haleakala National Park. Because they understood the special nature of Haleakala, the family strongly supported its designation as a national park.

After Sam passed away in 1950, Harry’s son-in-law, J. Walter Cameron, assumed ranch management. Eighteen years later Sam’s son, Manduke, became the president. Manduke Baldwin was known for his prowess as a cattleman, having grown up on a horse riding alongside Ranch cowboys.

During the 1970s, the Ranch suffered from extended drought conditions and a tragic loss of cattle. Manduke retired in 1976 and was succeeded by his son, Peter D. Baldwin who would preside over the Ranch for nearly 25 years.

Under Peter’s watch, with strong family support from his cousin Colin C. Cameron, the Ranch conveyed a conservation easement of 5,230 acres of pristine rainforest to the Nature Conservancy of Hawaii in 1983. Since then, the partnership has successfully preserved a rare habitat for many endangered native insect, plant and animal species. In 1991 the Ranch helped to establish the pioneering East Maui Watershed Partnership to protect Maui’s main source of water. The Ranch also became a partner in the Maui Research & Technology Park in Kihei.

When Peter retired in 2000, the Ranch hired Willard “Buzz” Stluka, its first president from outside the Baldwin family. During his six-year tenure the Ranch became a member of Maui Cattle Co. and joined the Leeward Watershed Partnership to help protect 43,000 acres of land from Makawao to Kaupo.

In 2006 another non-family professional, Don Young, was selected as president. In the years since, the Ranch has perpetuated its deep commitment to ranching while expanding its conservation work through a robust web of public and private partnerships. The Ranch has added new ventures including agreements with tourism companies like Skyline Eco Adventures, leases to agricultural businesses, and commercial real estate investments to help subsidize land stewardship programs.

The Ranch’s latest conservation work includes battling invasive species such as Axis deer, gorse and Madagascan fireweed, restoring native koa trees and protecting Nene habitat on Ranch lands. The Ranch is also helping to restore the Pu’u Pahu Reserve’s 1,200-acre alpine shrub ecosystem as a buffer zone for Haleakala National Park.

In 2013 the Ranch celebrated its 125th Anniversary. Today Haleakala Ranch remains a family-owned business still guided by the values of Harry and Sam Baldwin.

The full history of Haleakala Ranch is detailed in John Harrisson’s book Haleakala Ranch: Celebrating the 125th Anniversary (link to Amazon)


Description

We are happy to offer a classic style 5 panel custom US Navy ammunition ship AE 25 USS Haleakala embroidered hat.

For an additional (and optional) charge of $7.00, our hats can be personalized with up to 2 lines of text of 14 characters each (including spaces), such as with a veteran’s last name and rate and rank on the first line, and years of service on the second line.

Our AE 25 USS Haleakala embroidered hat comes in two styles for your choosing. A traditional “high profile” flat bill snap back style (with an authentic green under visor on the bottom of the flat bill), or a modern “medium profile” curved bill velcro back “baseball cap” style. Both styles are “one size fits all”. Our hats are made of durable 100% cotton for breathability and comfort.

Given high embroidery demands on these “made to order” hats, please allow 4 weeks for shipment.

If you have any questions about our hat offerings, please contact us at 904-425-1204 or e-mail us at [email protected] , and we will be happy to speak to you!


Sunrise and Sunset

Unpredictable cloud cover make each sunrise at Haleakalā unique!

View Current Conditions to learn more about the Park’s current status.

Still have sunrise questions? Check out our FAQs for sunrise reservations.

Make a Reservation

In order to view sunrise at Haleakalā National Park, you will need to make a reservation ahead of time.

  • Reservations can be made online up to 60 days in advance of your sunrise visit on recreation.gov and are only valid for the day reserved . These tickets are released at 7:00 am HST.
  • A portion of reservations for any given day will be released 2 days (48 hours) in advance
  • A visitor may only purchase one sunrise reservation per three-day period.
  • Upon arrival, please have the reservation holder present with valid ID, reservation confirmation email, and your park pass or a way to purchase one.
  • Please note that calling the park directly, or visiting in-person, will not result in a reservation. Staff at Haleakalā National Park are unable to make reservations for you.
  • Reservations will not be refunded or exchanged due to weather.
  • For questions, call the recreation.gov help line at 1-877-444-6777.

How to Book Through recreation.gov:

  1. Click Sign In or Sign Up to log in to your account or create a new one
  2. Visit the page for sunrise reservations
  3. Click the Book Now button under the first tab labeled Tour Park Details. This will take you to the next tab.
  4. Click the Enter Date button under "Online** availability."
  5. Select the tour date for ticket availability, and enter "1" for number of tickets. Click Find Tour Times.
  6. Select the 3:00 AM - 7:00 AM option.
  7. Enter the number of vehicles as "1" again.
  8. Click Book Tour.
  9. Have the permit holder present a valid ID and reservation upon arrival at the park entrance station.

The sun rises over the crater walls.

Plan for the Experience

  • The visitor centers remain closed due to COVID-19 precautions.
  • Weather immediately before dawn and immediately after dusk are regularly wet, windy, and below freezing.
  • There is no food, clothing, or gas for sale in the park.
  • The road up and down the mountain does not have streetlights or guard rails.
  • Drive time between the entrance gate and the summit is about 30 minutes.
  • Parking is restricted to designated lots only.
  • Parking lots will close when full.
  • For a more solitary experience, visit Leleiwi or Kalahaku overlooks.

What time is sunrise? What time is sunset?

January 1: 6:56am/6:00pm
January 15: 6:58am/6:10pm

July 1: 5:41am/7:16pm
July 15: 5:46am/7:15pm

February 1: 6:55am/6:21pm
February 15: 6:48am/6:29pm

August 1: 5:52am/7:09pm
August 15: 5:57am/7:01pm

March 1: 6:39am/6:35pm
March 15: 6:27am/6:40pm

September 1: 6:02am/6:49pm
September 15: 6:06am/6:33pm

April 1: 6:12am/6:49pm
April 15: 6:00am/6:49pm

October 1: 6:10am/6:19pm
October 15: 6:14am/6:06pm

May 1: 5:50am/6:55pm
May 15: 5:42am/7:01pm

November 1: 6:20am/5:55pm
November 15: 6:28am/5:49pm

June 1: 5:38am/7:08pm
June 15: 5:38am/7:12pm

December 1: 6:38am/5:47pm
December 15: 6:47am/5:50pm


Sunrise/Sunset times calculated from information from the Bishop Museum Planetarium.


Ship Nicknames

Various ship nicknames that I have collected during my reading and exploration of the Internet. This list of course is far from comprehensive. It mostly includes American and British ships, as sources describing these ships are more accessible.

Where possible and not otherwise self-evident, I have included 'explanation' for a nickname, as indicated by one source or another.

A ship might bear more than one nickname over the course of its career, or even at the same time. Different constituencies might have different names or 'shorthand' for the same ship. For example, the nickname used by a ship's crew may not be the same as the shorthand used by the high command, which may not be the same as the name used by the press (and public), which may not be the same one as used by the complement of a 'rival' ship within the fleet.

Nicknames are not always polite, and I am not responsible for any offense that any readers may take to the nature of or the mere inclusion of a particular name. Believe it or not, sailors sometimes seem to enjoy showing a healthy disrespect even for their own (naturally beloved) ship, and may themselves apply what would be thought a derogatory or insulting name. This is not to say that the crew of that ship might not take offense if an outsider were to refer to their ship by that name. In other cases, names are applied by the press, public, opposition, or elsewhere within a fleet, oftentimes based on a real or perceived deficiency in either the ship or crew, and such names may well be considered offensive by the crew of the maligned vessel. Tread with care.


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