Grave Relief for Philostrate

Grave Relief for Philostrate


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3D Image

Grave relief for Philostrate and Hippon, Athens, 350 BCE, Marble. Made with Memento Beta (now ReMake) from AutoDesk.
Hippon was buried after his mother Philostrate. Since he died unmarried, a wedding vase was cut in the pediment and his father´s comforting hand added.

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Northern Ireland's hidden history: Archaeologist works to identify unmarked mass graves

BELFAST, Northern Ireland — Jim Chambers will never forget the splash the box containing his stillborn baby made when it hit the mud. It was March 1957, and while his wife, Kathleen, lay in the hospital recovering from a traumatic labor, Jim and his father-in-law had taken his son to be buried. When he arrived at the bog at the bottom of Milltown Cemetery, a gravedigger took the box from him and threw it into a large pit, then carried on digging.

Finding the grave later would prove impossible.

“We didn’t know where to look,” Kathleen Chambers said. “There was no marker, nothing, and nobody talked about it. When I tried to talk about it, it was pushed aside. I was told ‘You’re a young woman, you’ll have more babies.’”

The Chambers’ child was one of thousands of children buried in unmarked mass graves in Milltown Cemetery from the early 20th century to the 1990s. Some were stillborn, and some had died shortly after birth. Others died in some of Ireland’s now notorious mother and baby homes, where pregnant, unmarried women were hidden away to avoid scandal.

The graves are a legacy of a time in Ireland when poverty and strict Roman Catholic teachings meant attitudes toward infant mortality were hardened. But the six acres of soft ground holding these children have now come to symbolize the burden of thousands of people who have been living with anguished uncertainty about the last resting place of their loved ones.

While the Republic of Ireland has made efforts to reckon with this past and provide answers, the same process has been slower in Northern Ireland due to decades of political violence and the continuing instability of the local government. An investigation into mother and baby homes in Northern Ireland was finally promised in January. But instead of waiting for an official inquiry, many people have taken it upon themselves to find answers.

They’ve been aided in their quest by one woman: Toni Maguire, a forensic archaeologist who has made it her mission to research the unmarked graves in Milltown Cemetery and other sites in Northern Ireland and locate the remains of children who were buried and then forgotten by everyone except their family. Her work has given hundreds of families what many of the bereaved take for granted: a spot, a patch of earth where they know their loved ones rest.


Graves’ Eye Disease FAQs

WHAT IS THE THYROID GLAND?

The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped endocrine gland that is normally located in the lower front of the neck. The thyroid’s job is to make thyroid hormones, which are secreted into the blood and then carried to every tissue in the body. Thyroid hormone helps the body use energy, stay warm and keep the brain, heart, muscles, and other organs working as they should.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF GRAVES OPHTHALMOPATHY?

Eye symptoms most often begin within 6 months of diagnosis of Graves’ disease. Very rarely eye problems may develop long after the thyroid disease has been treated. In some patients with eye symptoms, hyperthyroidism never develops and, rarely, patients may be hypothyroid. The severity of the eye symptoms is not related to the severity of the hyperthyroidism.

Symptoms of Graves’ eye disease include: Feeling of irritation or grittiness in the eyes, redness or inflammation of the conjunctiva (the white part of the eyeball), excessive tearing or dry eyes, swelling of the eyelids, sensitivity to light, forward displacement or bulging of the eyes (called proptosis), and double vision. In more advanced eye disease there may also be decreased eye movement and eyelids, incomplete closure of the eye with corneal ulceration, compression of the optic nerve and rarely, loss of vision.

HOW IS THE DIAGNOSIS MADE?

If you have already been diagnosed with hyperthyroidism, a doctor may diagnose Graves’ eye disease by examining your eyes and finding swelling and enlargement of the eye muscles. A computed tomography (CT) scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the eye muscles may be helpful. Graves’ disease usually is associated with other symptoms of overactive thyroid. However, the classic symptoms of hyperthyroidism may not always be present. In fact, Graves’ eye disease can occur even when the thyroid is not overactive at that time.

Graves’ eye disease often improves on its own. However, in some patients symptoms may persist despite treatment of the overactive thyroid gland and specific eye therapies.

PREVENTION

Graves’ disease and usually the associated eye disease cannot be prevented. However, radioiodine therapy used to treat hyperthyroidism is more likely to worsen the eye disease and should be avoided, if possible in patients with moderate or severe eye disease. Treatment with antithyroid drugs or surgery does not affect the course of eye disease.

If radioiodine is used to treat hyperthyroidism in patients with moderate or severe eye disease, taking a corticosteroid drug (prednisone) at the time of the treatment, which is tapered over several weeks may help prevent worsening of Graves’ eye disease.

Smokers are more prone to develop Graves’ Ophthalmopathy than nonsmokers and they should try to stop smoking. Second hand exposure to smoke has the same effect as active smoking and should be avoided.

HOW IS GRAVES OPHTHALMOPATHY TREATED?

If you have Graves’ Ophthalmopathy, one or more of the following treatments may help soothe your eyes and improve your vision:

Apply cool compresses to your eyes. The extra moisture may provide relief.

Wear sunglasses. When you have Graves’ eye disease your eyes are more vulnerable to ultraviolet rays and more sensitive to sunlight. Wearing sunglasses helps protect them from both sun and wind.

Use lubricating eyedrops. Eyedrops, like artificial tears, may help relieve dryness and scratchiness. Be sure to use eyedrops that do not contain redness removers. A lubricating gel can be used before bed to prevent the cornea from drying out because your eyelids may not cover the entire eye when sleeping.

Elevate the head of your bed. Keeping your head higher than the rest of your body may reduce swelling and may help relieve pressure on your eyes.

Prisms: If double vision is a problem, glasses containing prisms may be prescribed by your doctor. However, prisms don’t work for all people with double vision and your doctor may recommend surgery as a more effective option

Steroids. Swelling in the eyes may be improved by treatment with steroids (such as hydrocortisone or prednisone)

Eyelid surgery. Because in Graves eye disease, the eyelids are usually more widely open, some patients may have difficulty closing their eyelids, leaving the eyeballs more exposed, which causes excessive tearing and irritation. Surgical repositioning of the eyelid may help reduce the irritation.

Eye Muscle Surgery. Sometimes scar tissue from Graves’ Ophthalmopathy can cause one or more eye muscles to be too short. This pulls your eyes out of alignments, leading to double vision. Eye muscle surgery may help correct double vision by cutting the affected muscle from the eyeball and reattaching it farther back. The goal is to achieve single vision when you read and look straight ahead. In some cases, you may need more than one operation to get these results. These procedures are performed by an eye specialist called an ophthalmologist.

Orbital Decompression Surgery. When eyesight is threatened, a type of surgery called orbital decompression can be done. In this procedure, a bone between the eye socket (orbit) and sinuses is removed to allow more space for the swollen tissues. When the procedure is successful, it improves vision and provides room for your eyes to return to their normal position. There is a risk of complications, including double vision that persists or appears after surgery.

All these surgical interventions should be performed at a medical center with expertise in this area as they require a team approach, and correct timing to ensure best likelihood of success and minimize risks.

It is important that thyroid blood levels be maintained in the normal range. After treatment of an overactive thyroid, there is a high risk of becoming hypothyroid (an underactive gland). Adequate thyroid replacement is essential to help keep Graves’ eye disease from getting worse.

WHEN TO CALL A PROFESSIONAL

Call your doctor if you notice any changes in the appearance of your eyes or if you develop any of the symptoms of Graves’ eye disease.


Who can be buried at the Texas State Cemetery?

There is no cost for a burial plot at the cemetery. Other burial costs, such as a headstone and opening and closing the grave, are charged. The Texas State Cemetery Committee oversees the rules for who can be buried there:

1. A former member of the legislature or a member who dies in office.

2. A former elective state official or an elective state official who dies in office.

3. A former state official or a state official who dies in office who has been appointed by the governor and confirmed by the Senate and who served at least 10 years in the office to which appointed.

4. A person specified by a governor's proclamation, subject to review and approval by the Texas State Cemetery Committee.

5. A person specified by a concurrent resolution adopted by the Legislature, subject to review and approval by the committee.

6. A person specified by order of the committee, only if the committee finds that the person made a significant contribution to Texas history and culture in the following fields: air/space, agriculture, art and design, business/labor, city building, education, governmental service, industry, justice, military affairs, law enforcement, oil/gas, performing arts, philanthropy, public administration, ranching, religion, science/medicine, sports and writing.


Unknown remains

It's not yet known whether the coffins hold the remains of Black victims of the 1921 massacre, but there are compelling reasons to believe that they do, said Kary Stackelbeck, the Oklahoma state archaeologist who is leading the current excavations.

"The mass grave is located in the African-American section of the Potter's Field, which was established during the Jim Crow era," Stackelbeck told Live Science in an email. Jim Crow was the system of racial caste segregation in place in parts of the U.S. between 1877 and the mid-1960s, according to Ferris State University.

That location corresponds with witness accounts and documentary evidence, including a 1921 newspaper report that the city would bury "the bodies of 18 Negroes, killed in the rioting" at that site, she said.

"I felt a sense of relief and excitement," Stackelbeck said. "We were anticipating finding individual grave shafts of perhaps 18 [people], and we ended up finding a mass grave that could contain many more than that number."

The archaeologists expect the remains will be in "reasonable, but not excellent" condition after almost 100 years in the ground, she said. "We expect they can be exhumed, but we will have to practice careful excavation and take special measures to ensure that they remain sufficiently intact to allow for specialized analysis."

The commission will now go through a legal process to exhume the remains, which could take several months. They'll be followed by a series of forensic tests, led by Stubblefield, to try to determine their likely sex, age at death, height and ancestry.

Stubblefield said the ancestry of a person &mdash such as if they are of African or European descent &mdash can typically be established by examining the facial structure of the skull. Such examinations can look at the shapes of the eye sockets, the nasal aperture, and the bones of the jaw.


Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards

Summary of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards
Summary: The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards in Arlington National Cemetery are members of the 3rd United States Infantry Regiment, nicknamed "The Old Guard". The sentinels are assigned to guard the monument to ensure the respect and security of one of America's most sacred symbols. The guards adhere to a solemn and precise ritual called the changing of the guard ceremony.

The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards in Arlington National Cemetery perform their duties 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Their dedication to their sacred duty and their eternal vigilance is reflected in the 'Sentinel's Creed'.

Facts about the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards for kids
The following fact sheet continues with facts about Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards. The picture below provides the words of the Sentinel's Creed.

Who guards the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier? The army guards are from the 4th Battalion of the 3rd United States Infantry Regiment, "The Old Guard".

Why are there guards at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier? To ensure the continued respect and security of one of the nation's most sacred symbols

When do the guards change at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier? The guards are changed every hour, on the hour, from October 1 to March 31. From April 1 through September 30 another change is added on the half hour. The tomb is guarded 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. During nighttime hours the measured and precise step of the on duty sentinel remains unchanged from the daylight hours.

Why are the guards gloves wet at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier? To prevent losing the grip on the rifle.

How many steps does the guard take during his walk across the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier? The guard takes 21 steps and then pauses for 21 seconds after his about face to begin his return walk. The significance of '21' reflects the twenty-one gun salute, the highest honor given any military or foreign dignitary.

Facts about the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards for kids
The following fact sheet continues with facts about Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards at Arlington National Cemetery.

Facts about the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards for kids

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards Fact 1: In 1926, the first US Army soldier was posted to guard the memorial during cemetery hours.

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards Fact 2: On July 1, 1937 guard duty was extended to the 24 hour watch.

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards Fact 3: The 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment ("The Old Guard") formally took over the duties of Honor Guard on April 6, 1948.

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards Fact 4: The 3rd United States Infantry, "The Old Guard", has served continuously since 1784. It is the oldest active-duty infantry unit in the U.S. Army and is the Army's official ceremonial unit, escort to the president, and also provides security for Washington, D.C.

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards Fact 5: Guards must memorize 7 pages of history on Arlington National Cemetery and then recite it verbatim before being granted "a walk". The military ritual guard change ceremony, and the grave locations of nearly 300 veterans are also part of the requirements of a sentinel.

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards Fact 6: The guards hold no rank. This is because the rank of the unidentified dead is unknown and it would be inappropriate for the Unknowns to be guarded by someone who outranks them.

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards Fact 7: To these special guards, the continuity of this post is the key to the honor and respect shown to the honored dead and their duties remain uninterrupted during all weathers. During heat waves, blizzards, hurricanes, rain, sleet, snow and hail they continue their guard, welfare of the Soldier is never put at risk.

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards Fact 8: How often are the Guards changed? Every 30 minutes during the summer (April 1 to September 30) and every 30 minutes during the winter (October 1 to March 31). During closing hours the guard is changed every 2 hours. The tomb is guarded 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards Fact 9: The Tomb Guards march 21 steps down the black mat behind the Tomb, turns, faces east for 21 seconds, turns and faces north for 21 seconds, then takes 21 steps down the mat and repeats the process.

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards Fact 10: Out of respect for the dead, the guards carry the rifle on the outside shoulder - away from the Tomb.

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards Fact 11: Guards are not permitted to speak or break his march, unless someone enters the restricted area around the Tomb.

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards Fact 12: For a person to apply for guard duty at the tomb, he must be between 5' 10" - 6' 2" tall and his waist size cannot exceed 30 inches. A small number of female soldiers have applied and been accepted for the position

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards Fact 13: The average length of duty for guards at the memorial is 18 months.

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards Fact 14: Myths! Whilst off-duty guards are allowed to take alcohol!

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards Fact 15: The Hurricane: Hurricane Isabel was the deadliest, costliest, and strongest hurricane in the 2003 Atlantic hurricane season, but the sentinels continued with their sentry duties during this difficult night.

Facts about the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards for kids

Facts about Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards for kids: Changing of the Guard Ceremony at Arlington
The changing of the guard ceremony at Arlington cemetery is conducted:

● Every 30 minutes from 8am until 7pm (April 1 - September 30th)
● Every 60 minutes from 8am until 5pm (October 1 - March 31st)
● Every 2 hours when the Arlington cemetery is closed.

The Changing of the Guard Ceremony at Arlington
The changing of the guard ceremony at Arlington National cemetery is as follows:

1. A uniformed relief commander enters the plaza to announce the Changing of the Guard. He approaches the tomb, slowly salutes, then faces the visitors and yells requesting silence during the ceremony.

2. The relief sentinel unlocks the bolt of his M-14 rifle to signify that he is ready to begin the ceremony and the relief commander conducts a white-glove inspection of the sentinel's weapon. This is a real inspection and the relief sentinel can be sent away, leaving the current sentinel in place till the next scheduled Changing of the Guard.

3. The commander and the sentinel march to the center of the black mat where the duty sentinel stops his walk. All three soldiers salute the Tomb and perform the changing of the guard ceremony.

4. The words are as follows:

● "Pass on your orders." the relief commander instructs the active sentinel
● "Post and orders, remain as directed." is the active sentinel's reply
● "Orders acknowledged." answers the relieving sentinel

5. The relieving sentinel steps into position at the center of the black mat. All three soldiers salute the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

6. As soon as the relief commander passes, the relieving sentinel begins his own walk - 21 paces south, turn and pause for 21 seconds, turn and pace 21 steps south.

7. The actions are repeated until the active sentinel is relieved by the next guard.

8. Both the relief commander and the relieved sentinel exit off the right, which concludes the ceremony.

Facts about Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards for kids
For visitors interested in the history of WW1 refer to the following articles:

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards for kids - The President's Video
The following video will give you additional important facts, history and dates about the personal and political lives of all the US Presidents.

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards - US History - Facts - Major Event - Guards - Sentinels - Definition - American - US - USA - Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards - America - Dates - United States - Kids - Children - Schools - Homework - Important - Facts - Issues - Key - Main - Major - Events - Guards - Sentinels - History - Interesting - Guards - Info - Information - American History - Guards - Sentinels - Facts - Historical - Major Events - Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guards


Robert Gould Shaw

As I understand it, Robert Gould Shaw's parents decided to leave him buried in the mass grave near where he was mortally wounded at Fort Wagner. Is he still buried in that location beneath the sand? Is it now under water? Is there some sort of marker designating the burial spot?

Answer

Colonel Robert Gould Shaw (1837-1863) was the young white Civil War Union army officer who commanded the otherwise all-black 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He was killed while leading a fierce but unsuccessful charge by his troops on the sand and earth parapets of Fort Wagner on Morris Island near Charleston, South Carolina, on July 18, 1863. The 54th Massachusetts lost many men that day, with a casualty rate of over 50%. The other Federal units in the attack suffered heavy losses as well. Union casualties for the day numbered more than 1,500. Union Brigadier General Quincy Granville sent an inquiry to the Confederate commander of Fort Wagner, asking about the disposition of Shaw’s body. The reply was that Col. Shaw had been “buried with his niggers,” in a common grave, a trench along the island’s shore, close to the fort. Indeed, this was where all the Union dead were buried on the tiny island. Whether or not the Confederate commander thought of this as inflicting a particular insult on Shaw, this is how it was taken in the North, especially because Shaw’s fellow officer, Col. Haldimand Putnam, commanding the 7th New Hampshire Infantry, who also died in the attack, “received all the honors of sepulture which the circumstances of his death permitted, from the fraternal hands of his West Point classmate, General Robert H. Anderson, of the Confederate Army,” although his body was not recovered. Nevertheless, even in the few days immediately after the bloodbath, Shaw had become, in the North, an uncommon martyr for the principle of black emancipation, and sentiment sprang forth to exert every effort to exhume his body and rebury him back in his hometown of Boston as a hero. Shaw’s parents, however, prominent in Boston as strong abolitionists, resisted this sentiment. His father sent instructions to the officers of his son’s regiment, writing, “We would not have his body removed from where it lies surrounded by his brave & devoted soldiers, if we could accomplish it by a word. Please to bear this in mind & also, let it be known, so that, even in case there should be an opportunity, his remains may not be disturbed.” By September, the decomposition of the bodies in the trench had begun to contaminate Fort Wagner’s Confederate defenders’ fresh water supply, and they abandoned the fort as a consequence. Union soldiers immediately moved in, but, guided by Shaw’s parents’ wishes, did not exhume Col. Shaw’s body. Morris Island is smaller than 1,000 acres and is subject to extensive erosion by storm and sea. Much of the previous site of Fort Wagner has been eroded away, including the place where the Union soldiers had been buried. However, by the time this had happened, the soldiers’ remains were no longer there because soon after the end of the Civil War, the Army disinterred and reburied all the remains—including, presumably, those of Col. Shaw—at the Beaufort National Cemetery in Beaufort, South Carolina, where their gravestones were marked as “unknown.” The Boston area has at least three memorials to Robert G. Shaw. In 1897, the Harvard Memorial Society erected a tablet on Massachusetts Hall, which had long served as a dormitory, that listed some of its past student residents who had gone on to fame. This tablet included Shaw’s name (he had been a Harvard student, but had withdrawn before graduating), along with such other notables as Artemas Ward, Elbridge Gerry, Francis Dana, Joseph Story, Jared Sparks, and Francis Parkman. The Shaw family also placed a bronze tablet in memory of Robert Gould Shaw on an earlier-installed cenotaph in its family plot at Mount Auburn Cemetery in Boston. The most well known memorial, however, is the Robert Gould Shaw and Massachusetts 54th Regiment Memorial. It is a bas-relief of Shaw and his men, designed by Augustus Saint-Gaudens, and placed on Boston Common, across Beacon Street from the Massachusetts State House, in 1897. The memorial was the focus of attention during the late 1980s and early 1990s, concurrent with the making of the film Glory, that depicted the actions of the 54th Massachusetts at Fort Wagner. It occasioned a public reassessment of the fact that, beginning from the immediate aftermath of the attack, a significant portion of the sentiment of white Northern abolitionists had elevated Shaw’s place as a determined sacrificial martyr to the cause of black emancipation far above the level of the other men of the 54th Massachusetts, almost as if the black men of the 54th could do nothing by themselves without a white savior in the person of Shaw. Abolitionist Eliza Sedgwick’s 1865 poem about Shaw contained the lines: “Buried with the men God gave him—Those who he was sent to save Buried with the martyred heroes, He has found an honored grave.” Shaw’s mother and father did not have a patronizing view of the relationship between their son and his men and indeed shared a sentiment of African American empowerment that was embodied in a line from Lord Byron that abolitionists often quoted—“Who would be free themselves must strike the blow.” They objected to the original design for the memorial because it showed their son on horseback, elevated above the figures of the enlisted men around him on foot. Nevertheless, a public commission funded Saint-Gauden’s bas-relief, which portrayed this design, and it was dedicated as a memorial to Shaw. The public reassessment of the 1990s eventually refocused the memorial on the 54th Massachusetts as a whole, rather than on Shaw in particular.

For more information

The National Gallery of Art’s website on Augustus Saint-Gaudens Memorial to Robert Gould Shaw and the Massachusetts 54th Regiment, which features lesson plans for grades 3-12. Teach History’s blog entry on “Colonel Shaw, Sergeant Carney and the 54th Massachusetts,” by Ben Edwards.

Bibliography

Russell Duncan, ed. Blue-Eyed Child of Fortune: The Civil War Letters of Colonel Robert Gould Shaw. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 1992. Peter Burchard, One Gallant Rush: Robert Gould Shaw and His Brave Black Regiment. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1989. Michael G. Kammen, Digging Up the Dead: A History of Notable American Reburials. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010. Charles Cowley, The Romance of History in “the Black County,” and the Romance of War in the Career of Gen. Robert Smalls. Lowell, Mass: 1882. Lydia Maria Francis Child, ed. The Freedmen’s Book. Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 1865.


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Research Tip

Cemetery records may include images or transcriptions of tombstones, or other burial records kept by the cemetery. Family members were often buried near each other. Some people buried in a cemetery may not have a current tombstone marker.


Biblical Villains and Pig-Eaters

The Philistines are among the most notorious villains of the Hebrew Bible. This "uncircumcised" group controlled the coastal region of modern-day southern Israel and the Gaza Strip and warred with their Israelite neighbors—even seizing the Ark of the Covenant for a time. Among their ranks were the devious Delilah, who robbed Samson of his strength by cutting his hair, and the giant Goliath, who made King Saul's troops tremble in their tents until a young man named David took him down with a slingshot. (Learn how the tomb of Christ is at risk of catastrophic collapse.)


Single Season Relief Pitcher Records

Game Speficic Relief Pitcher Records

Do you believe relief pitchers are given the credit they deserve? Is this "position" the next to start receiving the big bullpen checks? Tell us on Baseball Fever.

A newly developed stat aimed directly at relief pitchers was recently coined and Baseball almanac was pleased to be the first online or in print to create a Holds Records section dedicated to this new pitching stat.

Did you know that there are only a handful of relief pitchers in the Hall of Fame and they are: Dennis Eckersley (&mdash starter / &mdash closer), Rollie Fingers, Goose Gossage, Bruce Sutter and Hoyt Wilhelm?


Watch the video: Grave - Thorn to Pieces


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  6. Eisa

    Amazing theme ....



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